Triangle Ranch Cowgirls

$45.00Price
These fabulous cowgirls were part of the Triangle Ranch, circa 1909. It wasn't until the advent of Wild West Shows that "cowgirls" came into their own. These adult women were skilled performers, demonstrating riding, expert marksmanship, and trick roping that entertained audiences around the world. By 1900, skirts split for riding astride became popular, and allowed women to compete with the men without scandalizing Victorian Era audiences by wearing men's clothing. 
   In the early Wild West shows and rodeos, women competed in all events, sometimes against other women, sometimes with the men. Cowgirls such as Fannie Sperry Steele rode the same "rough stock" and took the same risks as the men (and all while wearing a heavy split skirt that was more encumbering than men's trousers) and competed at major rodeos such as the Calgary Stampede and Cheyenne Frontier Days.

     In the potichomania process, the glass acts as both a foundation and protective finish, saving the step of varnishing. The original intent was to recreate Greek and Etruscan vases by simulating rare and expensive Sevrés porcelain.

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  • Details

    This tray measures approximately 5x8 inches. The relative thinness of the tray – just over 1/8” thick – belies the complexity of the potichomania process. Each of our trays is comprised of a glass tray, three layers of 28# paper, four coatings of varnish, and finished with two coats, each of paint and clear acrylic spray. We’ve added a high-quality felt pad on the bottom in order to protect your home surfaces.a

    Care: Please spray with a gentle glass cleanser and wipe clean. Do not submerge in water. For decorative purposes only.

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andy@whygirlsgoastray.com | Sacramento, California, United States | 916.753.0358

©Why Girls Go Astray. All rights reserved.